Exploring ‘The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor’

The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has recently published the Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor, an excellent tool accessible to everyone interested in the impact of culture and creative economy and urban and regional development.

The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor (CCCM) is a new tool to monitor and assess the performance of ‘Cultural and Creative’ cities in comparison, both in quantitative and qualitative terms, with others across European countries (this first edition covers 168 cities in the EU-28 plus Norway and Switzerland).

The CCCM evaluate cities/countries using 29 indicators relevant to nine dimensions reflecting three major facets of cities’ cultural, social and economic vitality:

Cultural Vibrancy measures the cultural ‘pulse’ of a city in terms of cultural infrastructure and participation in culture

Creative Economy captures how the cultural and creative sectors contribute to a city’s employment, job creation and innovative capacity

Enabling Environment identifies the tangible and intangible assets that help cities attract creative talent and stimulate cultural engagement.

The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor offers an interactive online tool that allow ussers to browse the 168 selected cities and the quantitative and qualitative information about thir performance. It also includes key facts about the cultural life of the city (I have just discovered a ‘Europe for Festivals’ on Traditional and Avant-Garde Music in Lublin!). It has also the option to create a new city entry, by adding new data, and to compare it to selected cities in the Monitor (however not fully available yet).

Culture and Creative Economy has become central to urban and regional development, particularly since the adoption of the first ‘European Agenda for Culture in a Globalising World’ (2007). However, mapping cultural and creative assets and measuring their value and impact in a systematic way acrross Europe has remained a challenge, particularly at city level. The CCM has the aim to meet this challenge, providing common evidences and insight on culture and creativity at city level to:

Support policy makers, identyfing strenghts, learn from peers and assess policy impact

Advocate and disseminate the importance of culture and creativity for improving socio-economic perspectives and resilience

Inspire new research questions and approaches to studying the role of culture and creativity in cities

So, let’s explore the CCCM for a couple cities, Seville (Spain) and Lublin (Poland) and see what key insight we can obtain.

Seville is the largest eity of the autonomous region of Andalusia in southern Spain. In 2006 Seville was appointed the first UNESCO Creative City of Music (important festivals include the ‘Festival de Música Antigua’ and the Biennial of Flamenco) The overal Seville Cultural and Creative Index is 20.1. The weaker facet of Seville is the ‘Creative Economy’ with only 7.2 on the index for Jobs in Media & Communication and only 2.2 on ICT patent applications. On the Cultural Vibrancy Seville shows strong index, 44.7 on Concerts & Shows indicator.

Lublin is the capital of the Lublin region and the biggest town in eastern Poland. It is known as a student city due to the presence of five universities. The overal Cultural and Creative City Index of Lublin is 14.2. Lublin shows strong performance on ‘Satisfaction with cultural facilities’, 35.7 (Cultural vibrancy) and on ‘People trust’, 63.6, (Enabling Environment).

Find out how does your city perform on the Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor and how it compares to peer cities on your country or across Europe!

On my side, I look forward to the availability of the ‘create your own entry’ option. In the meantime I will continue exploring and disseminating this great and inspiring tool for evaluating the Cultural & Creative Economy contribution to urban, economic and social sustainable and inclusive development.

Get in touch for policy evaluation and impact assessment studies on cultural and creative economy: contact@economiacreativa.eu
References:

Montalto V; Jorge Tacao Moura C; Langedijk S; Saisana M. The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor. 2017 Edition doi:10.2760/031627

Online Tool: https://composite-indicators.jrc.ec.europa.eu/cultural-creative-cities-monitor/

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How to improve stakeholders’ engagement


After the holiday season, September brings us a rentrée full of projects to plan, implement and disseminate. Great part of the success of these projects will depend of how key stakeholders engage on them; therefore it is fundamental to strategically consider stakeholders’ involvement from the conceptualization stage of project management.
The first question is why to involve stakeholders?

In the indutrial era the path of change was slower and stability greater than nowadays in our disrupted digital and global societies. Then companies and institutions were also considering the importance of society and other actors on their activity. However they were considering them more as ‘external factors’.

In the current context of constant change and ever more complex societies there is a higher level of uncertainty which makes very difficult for any single actor, whether public or private, to develop any project without considering other actors that directly or indirectly would be involved or taking part on it. It is, in consequence, essential to consider the role each stakeholder (customers/users, scientific institutions, corporations, government bodies, international organizations, civil society, NGOs, etc.) plays in achieving the general objective we pursue with a project and how they can contribute to the value creation and to minimize risk.

Secondly, we can ask ourselves which are the key principles of stakeholders engagement:

Identifying who are the key stakeholders

Relationship management,

Communication and planning

Understaning what ‘success’ means for every stakeholders,

Compromise and Responsibility

The first step is to identify, with a global and cross-sectoral perspective, who are the key stakeholders that can add value to the project (it might be financial support, endorsing and disseminating, institutional support, co-designing the service/product, providing insight, etc.).

Once we have identified them, it is crucial to communicate in order to understand the people/institution you will be working with and to gather information about them, so you can get to know better their behaviour and aspirations and find a better way to work together.

Remember to invest in a careful planning before engaging stakeholders and make an effort to build relationships based on mutual trust with the aim to increase confidence across the project environment, minimise uncertainty and speed up problem solving and decision making.

Keep the road map simple, using foresight to anticipate hazards and taking timely actions that can improve delivery. The initial step of this road map is to establish the most acceptable baseline across a set of stakeholders’ expectations and priorities, taking into account that project success means different things to different people. In this regard, the project will benefit from a good understanding of how each stakeholder perceives success in the context of the project delivery.

Finally it is the responsibility of everyone to understand the role in maintaining and ongoing dialogue and compromise for the overall value creation, risk management and successful delivery of the project.

 For consultancy and capacity building on improving your stakeholders’ engagement, get in touch: contact@economiacreativa.eu

Creative Innovation Global


At Economía Creativa we are proud Endorsing Partners of Creative Innovation Global 2017 Asia Pacific -for second year in a row- that will be held in Melbourne, Australia, 13-15 November 2017.
Early bird tickets are still available until 31st August, so do not miss this unique opportunity to stand with the global leaders and disruptors that are making a difference on creativity and innovation; join 40+ innovators and take part on Conferences, Master Classes, Deep Conversations and a Gala Dinner. Book your tickets on: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/tickets-external?eid=34564605666&ref=etckt

Ci2017 will help you understand and make the most of the exponential advances in artificial intelligence, automation of jobs, healthcare, energy, worksplaces of the future and other major trends. This event will give you the knoledge and tools to develop the leadership mindset you need to transform your organisation.

Who should attend? Ci2017 is the ‘must’ event for

change-makers, policy makers, activists, influencers, innovators, industry and government leaders,

CEOs and senior executives

Board Directors, entrepreneurs and business owners

HR & innovation professional

Coaches and consultants

Educators

Non for profit and CSR professsionals

Ci2017 will bring you unique benefits:

– Over 40 world class Australian and international innovators and leaders

– Highlight risks, opportunities, future scenarios and global megatrends

– Provide insights and techniques for unloking personal and organisational creativity and exponential thinking

– Deliver strategies, structructures and processes for creating transformation, greater organisational performance, productivity and wellbeing

– Showcase the world’s best practice solutions and ideas

– Bring together leaders and emerging talent to discover corss-disciplinary solutions

– Offer outstanding networking and buisness opportunities

As the pace of change accelerates, we are increasingly asking organizations to become more agile. Ci2017 will help you understand the importance of strategic creativity to our nations, communities and individuals to making the transition to innovation and knowledge based economyies. Creativity and innovation are vital for businesses exposesd to globalisation, increased competition, consumer diversitiy and rapidly changing technology.

Don’t forget that tomorrow’s competitive success will be based on the implementation of creative ideas and the ability to keep up with an ever-accelerating world! Don’t miss this exceptional event, Ci2017 where global leaders will meet! THINK, LEARN and BE INSPIRED!

You can download Ci2017 program here: https://www.creativeinnovationglobal.com.au/wp-content/themes/creative/2017-assets/files/Ci2017-PROGRAM-v2.pdf 

Exploring the ‘Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor’


The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has recently published the Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor, an excellent tool accessible to everyone interested in the impact of culture and creative economy and urban and regional development.The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor (CCCM) is a new tool to monitor and assess the performance of ‘Cultural and Creative’ cities in comparison, both in quantitative and qualitative terms, with others across European countries (this first edition covers 168 cities in the EU-28 plus Norway and Switzerland).

The CCCM evaluates cities/countries using 29 indicators relevant to nine dimensions reflecting three major facets of cities’ cultural, social and economic vitality:

Cultural Vibrancy measures the cultural ‘pulse’ of a city in terms of cultural infrastructure and participation in culture

Creative Economy captures how the cultural and creative sectors contribute to a city’s employment, job creation and innovative capacity

Enabling Environment identifies the tangible and intangible assets that help cities attract creative talent and stimulate cultural engagement.

The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor offers an interactive online tool that allow users to browse the 168 selected cities and the quantitative and qualitative information about their performance. It also includes key facts about the cultural life of the city (I have just discovered a ‘Europe for Festivals’ on Traditional and Avant-Garde Music in Lublin, Poland!). It has also the option to create a new city entry, by adding new data, and to compare it to selected cities in the Monitor (however not fully available yet).

Culture and Creative Economy has become central to urban and regional development, particularly since the adoption of the first ‘European Agenda for Culture in a Globalising World’ (2007). However, mapping cultural and creative assets and measuring their value and impact in a systematic way across Europe has remained a challenge, particularly at city level. The CCM has the aim to meet this challenge, providing common evidences and insight on culture and creativity at city level to:

Support policy makers, identifying strengths, learn from peers and assess policy impact

Advocate and disseminate the importance of culture and creativity for improving socio-economic perspectives and resilience

Inspire new research questions and approaches to studying the role of culture and creativity in cities

So, let’s explore the CCCM for a couple of cities, Seville (Spain) and Lublin (Poland) and see what key insight we can obtain.

Seville is the largest city of the autonomous region of Andalusia in southern Spain. In 2006 Seville was appointed the first UNESCO Creative City of Music (Seville organizes important festivals including the ‘Festival de Música Antigua’ and the Biennial of Flamenco) The overal Seville Cultural and Creative Index is 20.1. The weaker facet of Seville is the ‘Creative Economy’ with only 7.2 on the index for Jobs in Media & Communication and only 2.2 on ICT patent applications. On the Cultural Vibrancy Seville shows strong index, 44.7 on Concerts & Shows indicator.

Lublin is the capital of the Lublin region and the biggest town in eastern Poland. It is known as a student city due to the presence of five universities. The overall Cultural and Creative City Index of Lublin is 14.2. Lublin shows strong performance on ‘Satisfaction with cultural facilities’, 35.7 (Cultural vibrancy) and on ‘People trust’, 63.6, (Enabling Environment).

Find out how does your city perform on the Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor and how it compares to peer cities on your country or across Europe!

On my side, I look forward to the availability of the ‘create your own entry’ option. In the meantime I will continue exploring and disseminating this great and inspiring tool for evaluating the Cultural & Creative Economy contribution to urban, economic and social sustainable and inclusive development.

Get in touch for policy evaluation and impact assessment studies on cultural and creative economy: contact@economiacreativa.eu

References:

Montalto V; Jorge Tacao Moura C; Langedijk S; Saisana M. The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor. 2017 Edition doi:10.2760/031627

Online Tool: https://composite-indicators.jrc.ec.europa.eu/cultural-creative-cities-monitor/

Thinking ahead


The summer vacation, apart from resting, is an excellent time to thinking ahead, particularly when we are just a couple of weeks before ‘la rentrée’.
The summer break offers us the opportunity to detach from the tight agendas and take some distance from the everyday work in order to gain perspective.

This perspective can help us to make sense of the complex information and data accessible to us, identify clues, leads and trends in an ever demanding and fast-moving global context. 

Globalization is characterized by the convergence of sectors, the rapid switch of people’s behaviour and skills set needed to be upfront of new lifestyles, new technologies and norms. In order to lead and create value to your clients, users and stakeholders, and to yourself, it is fundamental to identify the vectors or directions which can bring new leads to your business or institution. It might be the development of an strategic partnership with a key stakeholder that can generate win-win outcome adding higher value to your current offering; or can be to take advantage of an external global trend and develop a new service or project to address it.

This assessment has to be done regularly. Do not assume you know what your customers or users want and need!

So I am doing now, thinking ahead and planning new directions for the autumn!

Reimaging ‘rural’

‘It is the visible and real world in its primitiveness and strength that is the natural subject of the thinking mind, and is able more easily than anything else to rouse it.’ Arthur Schopenhauer

Many rural areas suffer from depopulation due to the fast migration to urban areas that has taken place very rapidily in western countries over the last decades. Often, people in cities have lost part of their own identity and connection to their culture or traditions. Perhaps this is one of the reasons behind the interest in rural tourism as a way to reconnect with the real world and with oneself.

Of course rural tourism still a niche option; other type of tourism such as sun and beach continues to be the most common summer holiday for most of holidaymakers.

Although the traditional obstacles and limitations of rural areas remain in many people’s mind, such as the isolation, poor infrastructure, difficult access to technology and internent, there are not anymore such a barrier in many rural areas, particularly in Europe.

Nowadays you can enjoy the summer break in a rural spot while reading your favourite newspaper online or checking your emails (the entrepreur life!) without much difficulty. At the same time you can reconnect with nature (hiking, horseriding, cycling, etc.) and with the seasons: from the shining green of the trees in the forest, to bird watching or the yellow wheatfields ready to be harvested; and develop your creative skills (painting and photography and crafts, for example). And, more importantly, you can exchange life experiences with local inhabitants and (re)discover traditions and the wisdom of living a sustainable life.


Rural tourism provides also benefits to rural areas such as:

  • economic growth, economic diversification and stabilization,
  • employement creation
  • reducing out migration and contributing to re-population
  • protection and improvement of both the natural and built environtment
  • revitalizing traditions and cultual heritage
  • increasing recognition of rural priorities and potential by policy makers

The essential task by rural tourism boards, entrepreneurs and other stakeholders in rural areas is to change the perception that still remains in many people’s mind identifying ‘rural’ with ‘undeveloped’ places lacking of ‘things to do’ or ‘boring’. They have to develop a dynamic dialogue with urban audiences to reimaging ‘rural’ and the meanings of ‘rural life’ in a contemporary way; without forgetting that rural areas have always insipired thinkers, writers and painters such as Van Gogh or Brueggel; they are a source of inspiration and as Schopenhauer points out, nothing can harness more creativity than contemplating nature itself.

Applying audience development and creative storytelling to rural areas destination marketing provides unlimited opportunities to build narratives to reimaging rural with the active participation of both local inhabitants and tourists through online and offline actions.

This exchange will benefit both ‘city’ and ‘rural’ people and will set the ground to new projects fostering the social, cultural and economic integration of the territories.

I am leaving you now, I am off to my bike ride! Wishing you a great summer holidays!

Get in touch for master plan strategies and capacity building workshops on tourism audience development, storytelling and destination marketing contact@economiacreativa.eu